UNIT 102. Comparison 1

Canada-04 grammar
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C

A

Study these examples:
-—————————–
Should I drive or take the train?

You should drive. It’s cheaper.
Don’t take the train. It’s more expensive.

Cheaper and more expensive are comparative forms
-—————————–

After comparatives you can use than (see Unit 104):
– It’s cheaper to go by car than by train.
– Going by train is more expensive than going by car.

B

The comparative form is -er or more …
-—————————–
We use -er for short words (one syllable:)

cheap -> cheaper
fast -> faster
large -> larger
thin -> thinner

We also use -er for two-syllable words that end in -y (-y -> ier):

lucky -> luckier
early -> earlier
easy -> easier
pretty -> prettier

-—————————–
We use more … for longer words (two syllables or more):

more serious
more often
more expensive
more comfortable

We also use more … for adverbs that end in -ly:

more slowly
more seriously
more quietly
more carefully

-—————————–

Compare these examples:
-—————————–
– You’re older than me.
– The test was pretty easy – easier than I expected.
– Can you walk a little faster?
– I’d like to have a bigger car?
– Last night I went to bed earlier than usual.

-—————————–
– You’re more patient than me.
– The test was pretty difficult – more difficult than I expected.
– Can you walk a little more slowly:
– I’d like to have a more reliable car.
– I don’t play tennis much these days. I used to play more often.

-—————————–

You can use -er or more … with some two-syllable adjectives, especially:

clever
narrow
quiet
shallow
simple
  • It’s too noisy here. Can we go somewhere quieter / more quiet?

C

A few adjectives and adverbs have irregular comparative forms:

good/well -> better
– The yard looks better since you cleaned it up.
– I know him well – probably better than anybody else known him.

band/badly -> worse:
– “How is your headache? Better?” “No, it’s worse.”
– He did very badly on the test – worse than expected.

far -> farther (or further):
– It’s a long walk from here to the park – farther than I thought. (or further than)

Further (but not farther) can also mean “more” or “additional”:
– Let me know if you have any further news. (= any more news)

grammar
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